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Inés López-Dóriga, Guillem Vich, Sarah Koch, Sasha Khomenko, Oriol Marquet, Oriol Roig-Costa, Carolyn Daher, Davide Rasella, MarkNieuwenhuijsen, Natalie Mueller

Health impacts of electric micromobility transitions in Barcelona: A scenario analysis

A significant shift in the current transport paradigm is needed to provide sustainable and healthy ways of traveling and to help prevent ill-health. Within this context, transport authorities with local accountability are responsible for defining measures to reduce motorized vehicle fleets and congestion in cities.

MRP views:

This is a significant breakthrough in researching the positive impact from MM on improving air quality related mortalities and reducing transport accidents. The paper finds that MM Mode shift from passive transport modes provides health and environmental benefits. The reduction in fatalities is significant when shifting from cars and buses, but moves in the other direction when trips are switched from walking and biking. This is contrary to MRP research conclusions from analysing MM Operator accident data in comparison to bikes and motorbikes in ANZ. This is likely because bikes are significantly more risky in terms of fatalities and serious injuries, based on the numbers for ANZ so far.  A significant factor may be due to the lack of biking infrastructure in ANZ, which is highly likely to have a negative impact on active transport safety.

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Nikolaus Lang, Andreas Herrmann

Micromobility is clean and quiet — how can it be widely used?

E-scooters, e-bikes, and other forms of micro-mobility have the potential to cut the congestion, emissions, and noise pollution that plague our cities. It also represents a real tangible solution to the first- and last-mile transportation gap.

MRP views:

The World Economic Forum, based on a BCG study, makes some observations on the use and adoption of e Scooters and micro-mobility globally. It reconfirms the potential for MM to address FM/LM issues, and debunks the notion that MM is largely used for leisure and fun experimentation. However, the proposition that e Scooter trips switched from PT render e Scooters “at best neutral”. This is an unfortunate conclusion. Based on LCA results prepared by the MRP, e Scooters have a four times lower GHG emissions profile than buses in Australia and New Zealand. This is due to the fuel used for buses Down Under and the low occupancy on buses. So a conclusion such as this needs to be carefully limited, as it depends on the location where the comparisons are made.

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Cate Lawrence

Can an escooter driving school curb bad user behavior?

In an industry-first pilot in Rome and Milan, Dott is launching a scheme where bad riders who repeatedly park escooters badly (outside a permitted area or violating the Highway Code) are sent to a driving course.

MRP views:

A very timely article on safety and e Scooter rider behaviours. It is clear that the solution will be a combination of technology, collaboration with municipalities and education. MRP is currently undertaking collaborative research in a range of aspects together with MRP academics and collaborators. Some of the research focusses on specific technology development and implementation, including stakeholder safety and health, as well as cutting edge edutech.
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Jacob Zinkula

Canada is taxing luxury cars, yachts, and private jets as celebrities come under scrutiny for their emissions

Canada revealed new details about how it's hoping to make the wealthy think twice about contributing to the climate crisis with their extravagant modes of transportation.

MRP views:

Excellent move from Canada. Tax rate is a bit on the low side, as I am not sure it will be much of a disincentive to stop unsustainable elite spending behaviours. Wonder which country will be the next to announce a similar sustainability tax. The tax will only be effective if everyone is aligned, as luxury toys like yachts, private planes and rockets will simply be sold in untaxed jurisdictions if we don't watch out.
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Bill McGuire

A public information campaign on the climate crisis is urgently needed

Never has the need for a public information campaign been so great, not only to educate people about the climate emergency but also to flag what they can do to mitigate its impact, says Bill McGuire

MRP views:

At the moment there still appears to be a debate about the need to ask individuals to do their bit on climate change , with some calling this hypocrisy, based on the argument that industry has caused the problems in the first place and should therefore be responsible instead. This article calls out a few historic and memorable examples on the effectiveness individually targeted campaigns in moments of climate crisis. As per our readings on rising global water levels, public education seems to be a bridge too far for local and national governments, not only because there are still plenty of government officials who believe climate change is exaggerated by “snowflakes”. There are simply too many vested interests in the Status Quo who we suspect would be severely worried by the impact public awareness campaigns might have on individual consumption patterns, which would result in a direct financial hit on most of our large consumer oriented companies globally. MRP believes the only way to neutralize climate change impacts are by changing both individual consumption/ transportation behaviours, in parallel with more sustainable behaviours in the corporate sector. These two target audiences are not incompatible at all, but symbiotic. In contrast to the lack of public awareness discourse so far, the MRP will continue to focus on public education and awareness based on our collaborative research projects and initiatives.
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